about us

Who Are we

At Modern Homestead we help people create low-maintenance, regenerative and food productive properties. We believe that every property can be a “homestead”, no matter the size. We work with our clients to design and build gardens and stonework that are productive and ecological. In all of our stone design and work we use locally quarried and recycled stone and build using as minimal concrete as possible. We believe in creating beautiful gardens, relocalizing food, regenerating the land and creating resiliency in our communities.

Johnny is our lead stone mason and point man for all construction projects. He brings a wealth of experience and knowledge about plants, stone and construction to the team with his 10+ years working in landscape construction and masonry. He has a great eye for landscapes and plants, and seeing the possibilities they hold. Johnny loves building with stone and finding unique and creative ways to use stone in all landscapes.

Abby has been in "design" for a long time and has experience in landscape design and garden management. She has spent years working and volunteering on several local organic farms in the area. While we both work together on all of our designs, Abby is often the illustrator for them, using her skills both in drawing and graphic design. She also heads up our nursery, cultivating and caring for many of the plants we use in our designs. Abby loves teaching, subjects ranging from making yogurt or canning seasonal produce to pruning fruit trees and starting seeds.

 

We are excited to help you bring your landscape into its full potential!

What is Permaculture

Permaculture is a lense through which we see the world–looking at problems and seeing how they can be turned into solutions. It is a design process that it is applicable in any landscape or garden with any goals or objectives.

Permaculture is grounded in the resilient diversity of natural ecosystem, looking to the natural world as the model for how ecosystems work and thrive. In order for us to design systems based on natural models, we have to see ourselves as part of the natural world and form a deeper understanding of how these systems that we depend on work.

More than being sustainable, permaculture is regenerative design. Sustainability is about keeping things as they are and trying to not let them get worse, but to regenerate is to make something better, setting up systems that if walked away from, they would still be productive. By creating beneficial relationships that stack multiple functions, health is restored while at the same time we gain valuable yields.

In our culture, being “eco” or “green” is centered around a philosophy to make less of an impact, to do less harm. In this ideology, if the end goal is to have as little impact as possible, it would be better to not exist. This creates a dangerous and unproductive base from which humans interact with their environment and each other. Instead, permaculture depends on our ability to do good, our ability to be healing forces for the planet and communities. Then all of sudden our focus shifts and having an impact is our goal, footprint becomes something we want to leave.